Aphra Behn, the Incomparable Astrea by Vita Sackville-West - PDF and EPUB eBook

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Vita Sackville-West was a prolific British author, poet and memoirist in the early 20th-Century who is known not only for her...

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Details of Aphra Behn, the Incomparable Astrea

Exact title of the book
Aphra Behn, the Incomparable Astrea
Book author
Vita Sackville-West
Book edition
Library Binding
Number of pages
92 pages
Language
English
Published
August 28th 1992 by Reprint Services Corporation
File size (in PDF)
368 kB
Aphra Behn, the Incomparable Astrea

Some brief overview of book

Vita Sackville-West was a prolific British author, poet and memoirist in the early 20th-Century who is known not only for her writing, but for her not-so-private, private life. While married to the diplomat Harold Nicolson, she conducted a series of scandalous amorous liaisons with many women, including the brilliant Virginia Woolf. They had an open marriage.

Both Sackville-West and her husband had same-sex relationships. Her exuberant aristocratic life was one of inordinate privilege and way ahead of her time. She frequently traveled to Europe in the company of one or the other of her lovers and often dressed as a man to be able to gain access to places where only the couples could go.

Gardening, like writing, was a passion Vita cherished with the certainty of a vocation: she wrote books on the topic and constructed the gardens of the castle of Sissinghurst, one of England's most beautiful gardens at her home. She published her first book Poems of East and West in 1917. She followed this with a novel, Heritage, in 1919.

A second novel, The Heir (1922), dealt with her feelings about her family. Her next book, Knole and the Sackvilles (1922), covered her family history. The Edwardians (1930) and All Passion Spent (1931) are perhaps her best known novels today.

In the latter, the elderly Lady Slane courageously embraces a long suppressed sense of freedom and whimsy after a lifetime of convention. In 1948 she was appointed a Companion of Honour for her services to literature. She continued to develop her garden at Sissinghurst Castle and for many years wrote a weekly gardening column for The Observer.

In 1955 she was awarded the gold Veitch medal of the Royal Horticultural Society. In her last decade she published a further biography, Daughter of France (1959) and a final novel, No Signposts in the Sea (1961). She died of cancer on June 2, 1962.